Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For November 17th, 2017

Source: http://highscalability.com/
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Blog posts

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Blog posts


Hey, it's HighScalability time: 


The BOSS Great Wall. The largest structure yet found in the universe. Contains 830 galaxies. A billion light years across. 10,000 times the mass of the Milky Way.

 

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  • $25 billion: Alibaba's Singles' Day sales; 6+ million: Slack daily active users; 4ms: boot time for a unikernel based VM; 1 billion: out of date Android devices; 10-20%: increase in RAM prices; 8 million: lines of code in F-35; $3 million: lost by Isaac Newton in the stock market; 30: it's RAID's birthday!; thousands: bugs fixed with Pentagon hackathon; 6+ terabytes: earth satellite data downloaded per day; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • Berners-Lee: When I invented the web, I didn’t have to ask Vint Cerf [the ‘father of the internet’] for permission to use the internet
    • Germaine de Stael: Ridicule dries up the imagination.
    • Alex Hudson: A lot of technical write-ups focus on scaling, performance and large-scale systems. It’s definitely interesting to see what problems Netflix have, and how they respond to them. It’s important to understand why Google take decisions in the way they do. However, most of their problems don’t apply to anyone else, and therefore many of the solutions may or may not be appropriate.
    • @jpetazzo: Step functions: they're great, but they don't support dynamic fan out (i.e. invoking an arbitrary number of "sub-lambdas" in parallel).
    • parasubvert: Perhaps one of the lessons of architecture that is missing is to teach people how to evaluate tradeoffs, or in other words, “taste”. I don’t think we’ve ever really had good taste as an industry. Buzzword bingo has always ruled, with some exceptions.
    • Calvin Biesecker: The cost to change one line of code on a piece of avionics equipment is $1 million, and it takes a year to implement. For Southwest Airlines, whose fleet is based on Boeing’s 737, it would “bankrupt” them if a cyber vulnerability was specific to systems on board 737s, he said, adding that other airlines that fly 737s would also see their earnings hurt.
    • @QConSF: @natekupp shares some of Thumbtack's learnings on their journey to scale: from a PHP/PostgreSQL monolith with a self-managed Hadoop cluster, to Dockerized #microservices paired with managed/serverless data infrastructure #qconsf
    • Bail Bloc: Mine Monero, waste electricity, generate CO2 and send less money to a charity than you could have just sent directly! What’s not to like?
    • @Xof: The notion that the only way to be a good programmer is to let it consume your life is toxic.
    • @swardley: AMZN is now worth an IBM + Oracle + CISCO and you'd still have enough  change left over to buy most of VMware. Not bad for a decade of growth.
    • @swardley: I've been a bit gobsmacked by who is using Lambda recently ... there was me thinking that big / traditional enterprise would be testing the waters slowly. How wrong.
    • @crichardson: If GoLang becomes #1 it will primarily due to fashion rather fitness for purpose. It's far too low level/lacking in expressiveness for many kinds of applications. Eg. Enterprise/business applications. It is not what Java's successor should be.
    • Dropbox: IPv6 does show slightly better performance over IPv4. However, without detailed client-side and network information, it is hard to say definitely where the IPv6 performance gain is from.
    • Stack Overflow: Two tags stand out in this analysis, both with tremendous growth, and they have something in common. Swift is Apple’s language for developing iOS apps that is a successor to Objective-C, and the angular tag
    • @Falkvinge: I've said it before and I'm saying it again and again: in order to beat old-world banking, crypto must be at least an order of magnitude better. Old-world banking offers free instant tx between private accts, and 15-cent txs to merchant accounts. Beat that or be obsoleted.
    • Alex Hudson: I want to hear more about projects that deferred decisions and put off architecting until much later in the process. I want to hear more about delivery at real speed. Small pieces of software that are not necessarily interesting but deliver business value are the real heroes in our industry, and the developers who create them the real stars. I especially want to hear more about developers working with systems that have constraints. I want to hear from people pushing standard stuff beyond its limits. I think we grossly underestimate what off-the-shelf systems can do, and grossly overestimate the capabilities of the things we develop ourselves. It’s time to talk much more about real-world, practical, medium-enterprise software architecture.
    • David Gerard: BTC is very clogged at the moment, with around 100,000 unconfirmed transactions as I write this, and peaks of 160,000 a few days ago. Transaction fees peaked at around $20 just to get your transaction through. This wasn’t helped by long delays between blocks, as mining capacity moved to BCH — the time between blocks peaking at 63 minutes a few days ago, on 11 November. fork.lol, which charts the relative profitability of the two, was overloaded and inaccessible. If shutdowns of mining progress in China, then whoever remains in mining will become the power. This is currently divided between Iceland, India, Japan, Georgia and the Czech Republic.
    • linkmotif: There’s a very common ethos that if people just focused on shipping they would somehow magically ship but that’s not how software works. You can’t just will shipping. You need to know what you’re doing.
    • sp527: I had a serious epiphany when I read that Braintree managed to vertically scale a two node (“HA”) Postgres setup to transaction volume in the millions and a massive valuation. Stack Overflow has had a similarly lean footprint for much of its history.
    • @ben11kehoe: This graphic from @googlecloud App Engine is nonsense. GAE literally makes you select instance sizes
    • @danielbryantuk: "Any change made to a complex adaptive system is a gamble. We mitigate risks, but we can't eliminate them" @relix42 #qconsf
    • ivanstepin: Flickr implemented Lanczos algorithm while Discord uses near-neighbor ( much less resource-consuming, but with slightly less quality ) algo. It may turn out that the gpu mem<->cpu mem data transfer can eat all the benefits for such simple algo as near-neighbor scaling.
    • There's more. Lots more.