Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For November 10th, 2017

Source: http://highscalability.com/
Posting Date:

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Blog posts

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Blog posts


Hey, it's HighScalability time: 


Ah, the good old days. This is how the FBI stored finger prints in 1944. (Alex Wellerstein). How much data? Estimates range from 30GB to 2TB.

 

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  • 1 million: times we touch our phones per year; 13 million: lines of Javascript @ Facebook; 256K: RAM needed for TensorFlow on a microcontroller; 2,502%: increase in the sale of ransomware on the dark web; 800 million: monthly Instagram users; 40%: VMs in Azure run Linux; 40%: improved GCP network latency from new SDN stack; 50%: fat content of a woolly mammoth; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • Sean Parker: And that means that we [Facebook] need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit every once in a while, because someone liked or commented on a photo or a post or whatever. And that's going to get you to contribute more content, and that's going to get you ... more likes and comments
    • David Gerard: I spent yesterday afternoon on Twitter and /r/buttcoin, giggling. It was a popcorn overload moment for every acerbic cryptocurrency sceptic who ever thought that immutable, unfixable smart contracts were an obviously stupid idea that would continue to end in tears and massive losses, as they so often had previously.
    • @jessfraz: I remember now why I put everything into containers in the first place, it's because all software is 💩
    • Amin Vahdat: What we have found running our applications at Google is that latency is as important, or more important, for our applications than relative bandwidth. It is not just latency, but predictable latency at the tail of the distribution. If you have a hundred or a thousand applications talking to one another on some larger task, they are chatty with one another, exchanging small messages, and what they care about is making a request and getting a response back quickly, and doing so across what might a thousand parallel requests.
    • @SteveBellovin: Why anyone with any significant programming experience--and hence experience with bugs--every liked smart contracts is a mystery to me.
    • Neha Bagri: Startups worship the young. But research shows people are most innovative when they’re older
    • @manisha72617183: OH: I no longer tolerate complicated programming languages. My mental space is like Silicon Valley; rent is high and space is at a premium
    • @atoonk: On days like today, we're yet again reminded that the Internet is held together with duct tape.. #rockSolid #BGP #comcast #outage
    • @bradfitz: 0 days since last high impact bug in an experimental programming language on the Ethereum VM affecting millions of dollars.
    • TheScientist: The genetic, molecular, and morphological diversity of the brain leads to a functional diversification that is likely necessary for the higher-order cognitive processes that are unique to humans.
    • Woods' Theorem: As the complexity of a system increases, the accuracy of any single agent's own model of that system decreases rapidly.
    • Carlos E. Perez: The brain performs compensation when it encounters something it does not expect. It learns how to correct itself through perturbative methods. That’s what Deep Learning systems also do, and it’s got nothing to do with calculating probabilities. It’s just a whole bunch of “infinitesimal” incremental adjustments.
    • @erickschonfeld: “What can one expect of a few wretched wires?”—telegraph skeptic, 1841
    • @ErikVoorhees: The average Bitcoin transaction fee ($10.17) is now more than twice the cost of Bitcoin itself when I first learned of it ($5) in 2011 :(
    • LightShadow: StackOverflow should be one of the first internet companies to accept cryptocurrency micro payments. All they'd have to do is skim a small percentage from people tipping each other pennies for good answers
    • @lworonowicz: I feel like I killed a family dog - had to decommission an old #Solaris server with uptime of 6519 days.
    • Google: Andromeda 2.1 latency improvements come from a form of hypervisor bypass that builds on virtio, the Linux paravirtualization standard for device drivers. Andromeda 2.1 enhancements enable the Compute Engine guest VM and the Andromeda software switch to communicate directly via shared memory network queues, bypassing the hypervisor completely for performance-sensitive per-packet operations.
    • iAfrikan News: The first-ever fiber optic cable with a route between the U.S. And India via Brazil and South Africa will soon be a reality. This is according to a joint provisioning agreement entered into by Seaborn Networks ("Seaborn") and IOX Cable Ltd ("IOX").
    • @iamdevloper: 1969: -what're you doing with that 2KB of RAM? -sending people to the moon 2017: -what're you doing with that 1.5GB of RAM? -running Slack
    • Eric Schmidt: Bob Taylor invented almost everything in one form or another that we use today in the office and at home.
    • @ben11kehoe: I am so on board with CRDT-based data stores providing state to FaaS at the edge. 
    • VMG: “Code is Law” fails again.
    • Paul Frazee: In Bitcoin, acceptance of a change is signaled by the miners - once some percent of the miners agree, the change is accepted. This means that hashing power is used as a measure of voting power, and so the political system is essentially plutocratic. How is that significantly better than the board of a publicly traded company?
    • gtrubetskoy: Professor Tanenbaum is one of the most respected computer scientists alive, and for Intel to include Minix in their chip and not let him know is kind of unprofessional and not very nice to say the least. That is his only (and quite fair) point.
    • jsolson: Both approaches have tradeoffs, although I think even with ENA AWS hits ~70µs typical round-trip-times while GCE gets down to ~40µs. Amazon's largest VMs in some families do advertise higher bandwidth than GCE does currently.
    • @brendangregg: AWS put lots of work into optimizing Xen, including net & disk SR-IOV (direct metal access). But their new optimized KVM is even better.
    • @wheremattisat: “Facebook and Google are proto-AIs and we are their microbiome. The objective function of those AIs today is to make more money” @timoreilly
    • @ossia: "Weeks of programming can save you hours of planning." - Anonymous
    • @sallamar: For kicks, we run over 6.2 billion requests a month on lambda (450% yoy) at @ExpediaEng. Still cheaper than renting an apartment for a year.
    • @Joab_Jackson: At this point,IBM #openwhisk is the most viable #open source #serverless platform—@ryan_sb @thecloudcastnet #podcast
    • Polvi: I think PaaS is dead. That's why you see OpenShift and Cloud Foundry and everyone pivoting to Kubernetes. What's going to happen is PaaS will be reborn as serverless on the other side of the Kubernetes transition.
    • mmgutz: We're running our Debian farm on Azure thanks to startup perks. It's been up 100% for us the last 2.5 years. Azure service is no less or better than AWS.
    • zzzeek: I switch between multiple versions of MySQL and MariaDB all day long. If you aren't using specific things like MySQL's JSON type or NDB storage engine or expecting CHECK constraints to enforce on MySQL (oddly omitted from this feature comparison!), there is nothing different at all from a developer point of view, beyond the default values of flags which honestly change more between MySQL releases than anything else.
    • SEJeff: They [Azure] allow you to have native RDMA[1] for your VMs, something neither amazon or google will give you. As an oldhat Linux/Unix guy, it is somewhat amusing to think of Microsoft's cloud offering as the high perf one, but the facts don't lie. If you have true HPC style workloads such as bioinformatics, oil/natgas exploration, finance, etc, the extra node to node communication bits are necessary. The QDR fabric they have has a native speed of 40 Gbps. It is a shame they don't have FDR (56G) or EDR (100G), but still is quite impressive depending on your app. This also could be a game changer for large MPI jobs.
    • johnnycarcin: I've honestly yet to see a customer moving to Azure who has more than 50% Windows based systems. Almost everyone I've worked with only uses Windows Server for their SQL Server services, outside of that it's RHEL, CentOS or Ubuntu.
    • lurchedsawyer: So to answer your question as to what is needed for Azure to become a viable alternative to AWS: I would say about 10 years.
    • @mjpt777: If Google thinks latency trumps bandwidth then they should look to software before hardware for the main source of latency.
    • Ben Kehoe: Like so many things in life, serverless is not an all-or-nothing proposition. It’s a spectrum — and more than that, it has multiple dimensions along which the degree of serverlessness can vary
    • zzzeek: If I was doing brand new development somewhere I'm sure I'd use Postgresql, since from a developer point of view it's the most consistent and flexible. While for the last few years I've worked way more with MySQL / MariaDB and at the moment the MySQL side of things is a bit more familiar to me, I still appreciate PG's vastly superior query planner and index features.
    • There's more. Much more. Click through for more. More. More. More.

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